PHKAxNoeKuremoto collaboration
Kodama




Girl in Brown (Kodama 5)

One of two famous Thai nymphs, Nang Takian – The Ironwood Girl belongs to particular such tree. Since its timber is perfect local material to construct traditional wooden house and ship back in old times; before cutting down into log, a ceremony with offerings will be required. The sylvan spirit will be then invited to live on into the habitat and thus protecting people inside, to live peacefully or to safely reach the destination through storms. Ironwood’s seeds were threaded together in garlands and festooned on the twig, in and out of Kodama. Hand-gilding with gold leaf was done as a finishing as it was done on sacred objects.

Photographer
Chayaluck Peechapat




Sedimentation (Kodama 1 and Kodama 5)

Removing bad luck, winning a lotto, recovering from illness or fulfilling wishes; we pray to supreme beings since ancient times.
Regionally and religiously different, worship to deities come in various approach. The common one in Thailand is dressing up the tree with 7-coloured-clothes and garlands; which
you may found them on shrine, tree, or statues; even in the city center of Bangkok.

In this modern day with Atheism becoming more popular; it might sound superstitious but many Thais have faith in these dogmas, with no certain history on origin or how
it roots deeply. Just more clothes and garlands worn on, more holy the spirit will be, more people will come, and the believe live on.

Photographer
Teerachai Sanjaisri


Shadow Entities (Kodama 1)

Once in several years, a solar eclipse will be occurred – mythically believed that the sun was eaten by Rāhu, a dark demon which bring chaos and disaster. To prevent ourselves from ill-fated events, spiritually and physically maybe, exactly 8 types of any available offering and the spell are necessary. In this piece of arrangement; grass jelly, eggplant, sweet potato, grape, cabbage, allium, carnation, and Crocosmia were selected as dark ingredients. Can you spot them all?
Photographer
Pattaradhorn Rujeraprapa






Mark